As far as memorable titles for the Nintendo GameCube are concerned one of the many titles that instantly comes to mind is Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door which was released back in 2004. As an RPG title Thousand Year Door was much better than its N64 predecessor Paper Mario which came out back in 2000. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door had a very interesting plot along with the introduction of a new main villain known as Sir Grodus who was considered to be the leader of the Society Of X-Nauts. The Thousand Year Door also see players so battle with another new villain known as the Shadow Queen who eventually possesses Princess Peach while searching for the Crystal Stars throughout the game as as Mario. The main setting for this title takes place in a fictional city known as Rougeport where players are expected to interact with non-playable characters such as Professor Frankly and Goombella in order to progress throughout the game. As far as the storyline for The Thousand Year Door is concerned there was some interesting plot twists in the game such as the Shadow Queen’s treachery towards Sir Grodus which is something many people probably did not expect.

As far as popularity is concerned The Thousand Year Door was arguably the most memorable title within the entire Paper Mario series. Since its release Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door had reached over 2.2 million copies in sales. In fact: Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door was the ninth best selling title on the Nintendo GameCube and was arguably the best RPG Mario title that we got to see during the 00’s decade. The Thousand Year Door sold more than its 2000 predecessor and its a game that many people would love to see ported for the Nintendo Switch especially since we do not have a major Mario RPG title on the hybrid console right now. While Super Paper Mario from 2007 had a similar level of success in relation to sales on the Wii console The Thousand Year Door is a title that seems to stand out more to those who are huge fans of the Mario RPG series in general.

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