3D 3d gaming 3D Technology Article Electronics Entertainment Fun Game Gaming Gaming Industry Gaming Life Gaming World Single Player Single Player Mode Video Games

Could Bloody Roar have worked on the N64?

When it came down to fast-paced 3D fighting titles from the late 90’s Bloody Roar I & II were highly underrated in the eyes of some people. In terms of gameplay Bloody Roar in was more complex than the likes of Tekken 3 which also made its debut in arcade centers worldwide in 1997. Despite, how fun Bloody Roar was during the late 90’s the game was nowhere near as popular as Tekken 3; which is often regarded as the greatest 3D arcade fighting title of all-time. Tekken 3 was also a massive success commercially selling over 8.3 million worldwide on the PS1 and becoming the fifth best selling game in the console. There has always been the question on whether or not Bloody Roar could have stood out more on the N64 during the late 90’s opposed to the PS1. In terms of graphics just about any 3D fighting game would look better on the N64 in comparison to the PS1. Also, the N64 hardly had any high profile fighting titles especially since Capcom was releasing all of their games for the PS1 during late 90’s.

In theory Bloody Roar would not be a good fit on the N64 due to the violence along with the fact that it appeals more to young adults than children. However, there were games like Mortal Kombat 4 which ended up being ported for the N64 which still managed to be an attraction for that console. Even though, the PS1 had sold way more than the N64 Bloody Roar may of had a better chance in becoming more successful on the 64-bit console. One of the main reasons why Bloody Roar never appeared on the N64 is because it was licensed by Sony Interactive Entertainment during its release in North America. Also, there was very slim chance that Nintendo wanted to license Bloody Roar since they had no real reason to do so. While the Bloody Roar was exciting it could not compete with Tekken series which had arguably peaked during the late 90’s in terms of popularity.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: